1866 - 1888

Founder Egbert Wagenborg with his wife Abelina Lukkina Vegter
Founder Egbert Wagenborg with his wife Abelina Lukkina Vegter

The year is 1866. Egbert Wagenborg, our company's founder, is born on the 10th of June.

His interest in the maritime world already begins as a child and at the age of just 10 he goes on board the 114-ton tjalk (a traditional Dutch sailing barge) named "Geertuida", which belongs to his brother Geert.

The next decade flies by and Egbert decides to live the life of an independent skipper. He turns to shipbuilder Niestern , who is tasked with building his first ship.

In 1888, Egbert – at the age of 22 - marries his sweetheart Abelina Lukkina Vegter.

 
 

1889

Egbert and Abelina, with their daughter born in 1889, move on board their brand new tjalk, "Broedertrouw", which is ready to set sail in 1889. They make many voyages, including trips to Scandinavia, often carrying peat on the way out and wood on the return trip.

 
 

1898

A decade on, in 1898, Egbert decides to move permanently ashore. The expanded family, which now counts six children, moves to Nieuweweg in Delfzijl. And the family have another addition, the second ship, the “Liberté” has now been completed. The business of "E. Wagenborg scheepsbevrachter Delfzijl" is conducted from a café on the corner of Waterstraat - Markstraat, opposite the Waterpoort. The early business is all about the timber trade and involves contracting the unloading of seagoing vessels carrying timber and transporting it to and from timber yards in the North of the Netherlands.

 
 

1901

In 1901 the family moves to Nieuwstad, where the office is also located. Egbert now has a broad portfolio of activities and is working as a charterer, tradesman and ship owner.

 
 

1903

Port Delfzijl around 1900
Port Delfzijl around 1900

Just two years later, in 1903, the family moves again, this time to premises in Waterstraat, where there is also an office. A wide range of commercial activities are gradually developed which include trading in coal that is "delivered directly from ship to home". Egbert continues the expansion of the fleet and he also buys a number of pontons for use as floating coal stores in order to keep pace with the huge demand for bunker coal. During that year the shipyard Niestern, now established in Farmsum, delivers the transport barge "Concurrent". By the end of the year Concurrent is joined by the steel, single-mast tjalk "Concurrent II", weighing about 90 tons. Egbert also buys the steam tug "Jo". At the turn of the century Delfzijl has a large fleet of tugboats assisting the oceangoing ships in the harbour. In the meantime, Delfzijl has also become a significant port for saltpeter, which is mostly shipped from Chile.

 
 

1908

1908 sees Niestern complete the “Liberté II”, which is somewhat of a flagship for the company. After a long and chequered history, in 2009 this tjalk finds a new home at the company's current headquarters in Marktstraat, Delfzijl.

 
 

1907 - 1911

Between 1900 and 1910 many Dutch workers are employed at the neighbouring German port of Emden. Passenger ships sail from there, but mainly for pleasure cruises in the summer. Egbert Wagenborg spots an opportunity and sees that there is a need for a regular passenger service throughout the year. Therefore, Egbert asks engineering company Van Dam & Gorter in Uithuizen to convert a river tug into a passenger ship and she is christened "Anna Meika". A scheduled passenger and cargo service between Delfzijl and Emden is launched on 15 May 1905. From 1907, "Anna Meika" also sails three times a week to Borkum. Wagenborg’s Passagiersdiensten (passenger services) is born. In 1908 a custom-built passenger vessel - the steel steamship "Vooruitgang" - is taken into service alongside the "Anna Meika". Shortly afterwards the "Anna Meika" is rechristened "Vooruitgang II" and returns to the tugboat fleet. The Vooruitgang II is then sold in 1911, releasing the name for a new Vooruitgang II.

Ferry 'Vooruitgang' was delivered in 1908
Ferry 'Vooruitgang' was delivered in 1908

The Voortuigang II is the ship that determined the shipping company's well-known trademark. Vooruitgang II originally had three white bands around a black funnel but when one of the bands was affected by rust, Egbert decided that two bands was "quite enough". At that time the ships also sailed under their own flag where the Delfzijl colours red-white-red are divided into diagonal sections. The white left and red right sections are adorned with the letters EW and DZ. As a final touch, the black funnel with the two white bands was placed in the middle of the flag.

 
 

1914 - 1918

Activities in the port of  Delfzijl
Activities in the port of Delfzijl

And then the First World War breaks out in 1914 and all sea shipping stops. The Germans place mines in the estuary of the Eems and around the island of Borkum and they have to give permission to any vessels wanting to leave the harbour. During the war the port becomes especially busy with the shipment of timber from the Baltic. The German ships can no longer cross the North Sea to Antwerp, Rotterdam or Amsterdam therefore everything to and from the Netherlands, Belgium and southern Germany is shipped via Delfzijl. A new business activity begins when the stevedoring firm Stuwadoorsmaatschappij N.V. is established in March 1917. The stated aim of the company is: "To have goods loaded, unloaded and received and all related matters; to have them transported or placed by steam and other seagoing ships, which are to undergo customs clearance in the ports of Delfzijl."

The passenger services on Borkum and Norderney is brought to a halt when the war breaks out. Egbert Wagenborg is asked by a number of businessmen from Groningen to run the ferry service between Groningen and Schiermonnikoog now that the "Thea Lotte", owned by the German Count Von Bernstorff, is no longer in use. Originally he thinks he is able to meet this request because the Vooruitgang II has been freed up since the Emden service is stopped. Unfortunately, the Vooruitgang II is unable to complete the entire route because the lock at Zoutkamp is just a few centimetres too narrow for the ferry. However, Egbert solves this problem by having the “Koningin Wilhelmina” sail the first part of the route and then Vooruitgang II is standing by outside of the lock.  The embarkation and disembarkation process on Schiermonnikoog is laborious and rudimentary because there is no jetty on the island. That means that the ships have to anchor and bring the passengers ashore with landing boats. The boats sail up to the shore where a horse and cart arrives to pick the passengers up for their onward journey.

 
 

1921

1921 is another important year, both business wise and personally. This time Wagenborg extends its ferry services to the West, to Ameland.

On 27 May 1921 Egbert Wagenborg buys a new home “with its own land and garden” in Nieuwstad in Farmsum and the home office in Waterstraat is occupied by Egbert’s son Petrus Wagenborg and his wife Aaltje Wagenborg-Veenstra. Two children are born, Egbert and Albert but in 1923 Petrus tragically dies of tuberculosis. Egbert is determined to help his daughter-in-law Aaltje find a new life and helps her to become an inspector at the seaside resort on Schiermonnikoog island, where she is employed by N.V. Mij. Tot Exploitatie van Noordzeebaden and Wagenborg’s Passagiersdiensten. The family moves to Schiermonnikoog and around that time uncle Geert joins the company. He takes over the passenger service and starts to modernise it.

Dienstregeling veerdienten 1922
Dienstregeling veerdienten 1922
 
 

1924

During the nineteen-twenties Wagenborg decides to start longer sea voyages. The first charter is completed on 5 February 1924:  a cargo of roof tiles transported on the ship "de Weldaad" skippered by Daniël Pot. From this point on, the number of charters increases steadily as each year goes by.

 
 

1925 - 1927

First motor vessel 'Fivel'
First motor vessel 'Fivel'

A change of the guard takes place in 1925, when son Geert Wagenborg and son-in-law Lourens Vuursteen join the company. Wagenborg flourishes under the new management, the number of charters rises and the arrival of maritime engines make it possible to maintain schedules more easily. Finding cargo is a time-consuming business. But the solution is found in the form of a broker who arranges the cargo and shore matters for the skipper.

Around this time the commercial ambitions of Lourens Vuursteen come into their own when the first motor vessel, "Fivel" is purchased in 1927.

 
 

1930

Wagenborg continues to expand its portfolio of companies, which includes the “Schuitenvaardersvereniging” or "Bargemens' Society", which is taken over in 1930. The company Schuitenvaarders is the latest manifestation of the centuries-old boat service between Delfzijl and Groningen. In its oldest form it was a towing barge, known in the Groningen dialect as a “snikke” or “snik”. In fact, the towing cable of the Delfzijl-Groningen towing barge service dates from 1653!  The most famous boat of the Schuitenvaarders is the "Koningin Wilhelmina", which entered history with the nickname "Bruintje Beer" (Brown Bear). These towing barges were used for a variety of cargoes: medicines, rivets and anchors but also livestock destined for the slaughterhouses. The bell from this historic service is now mounted in the hall of the Wagenborg head office in Delfzijl.  The emergence of other forms of passenger and freight transport eventually leads to a decline in the use of boat transport and the ship is sold-off around 1960.

 
 

1932

A few years later a branch office is opened in the city of Groningen in October 1932. The office handles chartering, customs clearance, forwarding and related matters.

 
 

1934

In 1934 the company again undergoes an expansion and Cartonexport N.V. is established to transport cardboard to England. As the coasters are able to load and unload their cargoes far inland via canals, rivers or tributaries - virtually at the front door of the factories - they prove to be more than a match for the larger ships that currently deliver the cardboard.

 
 

1936 - 1939

Hotel De Beurs before Wagenborg establishes her head office at this location
Hotel De Beurs before Wagenborg establishes her head office at this location

Despite the economic recession the company continues to grow. In 1936 the Amsterdam office is opened, followed by an office in Rotterdam in 1939. In 1937 the company has once again outgrown the office it opened in Groningen in 1932. To accommodate this growth the company buys a piece of land for a new office at the address Voormalig Klein Poortje on the corner of Binnendamsterdiep. 
 

In 1938 en 1940 wordt de vloot uitgebreid met de sleepboten “Golfbreker” en “Woelwater” van 150 pk.  Beide schepen zijn gebouwd door scheepswerf Bijlsma in Wartena.

Tug Golfbreker
Tug Golfbreker
 
 

1940 - 1945

The outbreak of World War II in May 1940 has a major impact on the shipping trade. Not many ship owners are inclined to put into countries at war, and when there is a real danger of mines. With the passage of time the situation begins to stabilise and Groningen-based motor vessels resume their regular passage from the Baltic to Delfzijl with cargoes of sawn timber. Delfzijl becomes a popular transit port and for the first few years it teems with shipping traffic. The offices in Rotterdam and Amsterdam find themselves with less to do and eventually they are closed down.

During the forties a new shipping office is built where the hotel-restaurant "De Beurs" is located. This is built with the unusual addition of a lookout station on the roof so that the ship agents can spot ships on the Eems from far away. This is extremely efficient as the loading and unloading administration can be settled by the time the ships arrive in port. The office is designed by Groningen architect J. Beckering Vinckers and the much admired image of the scantily-clad woman (symbol of the sea) above the entrance is the work of artist Willem Valk. During the low-key opening of the office the staff presents the management with a painting of their latest acquisition: the coaster "Favoriet".

Coastal shipping is strictly regulated and monitored during the war. Military laws are introduced making it possible for the Germans to seize ships from their owners and use them for their own purposes and in some cases ships are converted and put into military use. In 1941 the ship "Favoriet", built by shipyard Sander in Delfzijl, is seized by the Germans and is subsequently lost at Saint Malo in April 1942.

The new office at Marktstraat has only just been opened when it is commandeered by the Germans in August 1942 to be deployed as a hospital.

After the war it emerges that the ship "De Hollandia" has played an important role in the resistance.  This ship, with Captain Roossien at the helm, was used by the resistance group Zwaantje to get to neutral Sweden. It was easy to hide people on board on the way out and on the return journey the ship brought illegal transmitters into the Netherlands. The resistance group was eventually betrayed.

After the liberation, offices and homes are cleaned up and various owners travel  throughout Europe to search the ships that the Germans had taken, and this ironically results in foreign ties being re-established.

 
 

1948

1948 is another milestone in Wagenborg’s history when the company celebrates its fiftieth anniversary.

 
 

1950 - 1952

The nineteen-fifties is a period in which Wagenborg raises its profile as a shipping company and activities are recommenced with the ships "Eemshorn", "Hollandia" and "Friesland". The vessel "Egbert Wagenborg" occupies a special position among the ships that arrive in the early fifties. This is of course, the name of the founder, the bridge is located amidships. During the summer she transports timber and salt in the North Sea and the Baltic, and during the winter often carries boxes of washing powder from Whitehaven to Genoa.

The 'Egbert Wagenborg'
The 'Egbert Wagenborg'
 
 

1956

Tug 'Watergeus' at work
Tug 'Watergeus' at work

In 1938 and 1940 the 150 HP tugboats "Golfbreker" and "Woelwater" are added to the fleet.  Both ships are built by Bijlsma in Wartena.

 
 

1953 - 1958

As Wagenborg's fleet of coasters rapidly starts to grow in 1953 it is sometimes difficult to find the inspiration for new ship names, so Wagenborg decides to name the ships after rivers with the extension "borg" added on.

And indeed, the "Kroonborg" is at that time the largest coaster in the Netherlands. She is built at Niestern in 1954, has a cargo capacity of 1,025 tons and is equipped with a 1200 HP Industrie diesel engine and the bridge is amidships. Maritime industry insiders often describe her as the most beautiful coaster they have ever seen.

Kroonborg
Kroonborg
Balticborg
Balticborg

During the fifties Wagenborg has a sizeable fleet of 500 tonners. Wim Vuursteen is closely involved in the preliminary studies and the building process. From his drawing board general plans originate for the characteristic Wagenborg vessels “Kroonborg”, “Oranjeborg”, “Nassauborg”, “Prinsenborg”, “Balticborg”, “Bothniaborg” and the new harbour tugboats.

 
 

1959

Merweborg
Merweborg

In 1957 there are signs of a recession in the freight market. Wagenborg puts a few more ships into service.

Late fifties, early sixties a number of Dutch coasters are sold abroad. Wagenborg responds well to the situation and starts to modernise the organisation and invests in the fleet. In 1959 the management orders six 500 tonners and a second large seagoing vessel, the "Bothniaborg".

Another important piece of history is written when the "Merweborg" is completed in 1959 by Apol in Appingedam. In 1951, a huge layer of rock salt is discovered close to Winschoten and the presence of this precious resource brings the Koninklijke Nederlandse (Royal Dutch) Soda-industrie to Delfzijl. Salt and soda production officially get underway and on 1 April 1959 the first cargo of salt is transported by the "Merweborg".

 
 

1960

In 1959 an upsurge in passenger transport also becomes apparent so Wagenborg makes the decision to invest in a large passenger ship with a capacity for 750 people. Built at Scheepswerf Appingedam N.V., the ship is given the name "Rottum" and is launched on 25 May 1960.

 
 

1960 - 1969

The Wagenborg fleet is further extended in the nineteen-sixties with ships including the “Lingeborg”, “Berkelborg”, “Bothniaborg”, “Schieborg”, “Delfborg”, “Hunzeborg” and “Vechtborg”. This takes the fleet up to 24 vessels, which represents 17,700 DWT and 12,000 HP in engine capacity.

Lingeborg
Lingeborg
Schieborg
Schieborg
Hunzeborg
Hunzeborg
Vechtborg
Vechtborg
 
 

1966

In 1966 Wagenborg starts a programme aiming to lower the average age of the fleet. The "Egbert Wagenborg" is sold off and the sister ships "Geulborg" and "Roerborg" are ordered. The "Geulborg" is built at Scheepsbouw- en reparatiewerf Gebt. Sander N.V. in Delfzijl and Scheepswerf (Shipyard) Appingedam N.V. is chosen for "Roerborg". The addition of these two ships marks the end of an intensive newbuild period.

The ships are deployed on what is known as the Black & White Line, initiated by Egbert (Bert) Wagenborg, son of the former Managing Director Geert Wagenborg. The Black & White Line consists of a number of separate contracts, transporting coal to England on the one hand, and returning with white China clay to Maastricht on the other, hence the Black & White name.

Geulborg
Geulborg
Roerborg
Roerborg

In 1966 the board consists of Wim Vuursteen, Koop Wagenborg (son of shareholder Petrus), Egbert Wagenborg (son of managing director Geert) and Egbert L. Vuursteen. Wim Vuursteen and Egbert L. Vuursteen manage the shipping company, the passenger services and the towage service.  While managing director Koop Wagenborg is responsible for the stevedoring activities and the terminal that was purchased in 1970. Bert Wagenborg is the Chartering Director and specialises to an increasing extent, in acquisition and customer relation management.

 
 

1967

At the meeting of shareholders held on 28 June 1967, Geert Wagenborg steps down as Managing Director of the independent N.V. E. Wagenborg's Scheepvaart en Expeditiebedrijf.

Office Wagenborg in the year 1967
Office Wagenborg in the year 1967
 
 

1968

Markborg
Markborg
Prinsenborg
Prinsenborg
Nassauborg
Nassauborg
Kroonborg and Oranjeborg
Kroonborg and Oranjeborg

In the late sixties the timber package trade makes its entry. Timber is no longer stowed plank by plank in the hold, but compiled into packages at the sawmills. Existing vessels have to be adapted to the new shipping method and Wagenborg has the “Markborg”, “Oranjeborg”, “Prinsenborg” and “Nassauborg” converted. The latter two ships are also extended by 74.41 metres.

 
 

1969

There are also developments in the towage sector. Wagenborg's management orders two tugboats from Amels in Makkum, each equipped with a 750 HP Kromhout engine. The first ship is christened "Waterpoort" and she is joined by the "Waterman" in 1969.

Tug Waterpoort
Tug Waterpoort
 
 

1970

For a period of four years no new ships are built, which gives the company time to consider its next step. Shipyard Amels is commissioned to build a ship with a rectangular hold: the "Scheldeborg". This is the first in a new generation of timber vessels and she is added to the fleet on 1 April 1970.

Scheldeborg
Scheldeborg

Wagenborg Terminal B.V. – with its own quays and storage space - is also established in the same year. The introduction of increasingly large ships brings the days of 'door-to-door' delivery to an end. It is no longer possible for the larger ships to moor far inland at the supplier's location. With the new terminal and plenty of storage space, Wagenborg becomes the vital link between sea and road transport.

 
 

1971

The following year Wagenborg takes over the haulage company Godlieb in Farmsum, which has five trucks. Under the name Wagenborg Wegtransport B.V. this company owns 20 trailers just 12 months later on.

 
 

1974

In 1974, the "Maasborg" - at 3,500 tons and slightly larger than its sister timber ships - "Scheldeborg" and "Rijnborg" joins the fleet. There are now thirteen " borg ships".

Maasborg
Maasborg
 
 

1980

Ferus Smith Shipyard carries out a study examining new ship designs in 1980, which results in a dry cargo coaster with a low clearance and a tonnage ranging from 1,250 to 1,500 tons.

 
 

1982

Two years later, two new ships are placed under the Wagenborg flag, the "Polarborg" and "Lindeborg".

Lindeborg
Lindeborg
Polarborg
Polarborg
 
 

1986

During the nineteen-eighties the Directorate for Public Works and Water Management decides to sell off its marine services and Wagenborg is the obvious candidate to takeover. Subsequently, the acquisition takes place on 1 January 1986.  A design for a new generation of passenger ships is produced and the first ship to be completed is the "Sier" and the "Oerd" follows a few months later. Their predecessors, the state-owned vessels “Prins Willem IV” and “Prinses Anna” are renovated and renamed “Brakzand” and “Simonszand” and added to the fleet.

Ferry Brakzand
Ferry Brakzand
 
 

1989

Reining Transport B.V. is taken over on 2 January 1989.

 
 

1984 - 1986

In April 1984 Koop Wagenborg steps down as director and he is succeeded by Jan P. van Niejenhuis. In 1985, Chairman of the board Wim Vuursteen, also steps down. And in 1986 director Egbert L. Vuursteen leaves the company.

Rob Wagenborg and Egbert Vuursteen join the company in 1985. Rob Wagenborg as managing director of Kramer Transport B.V. and Egbert Vuursteen as commercial manager of the shipping sector.

 
 

1985

Kramer Transport is taken over on 30 August 1985.  By this time the company has an impressive fleet of trucks, tanker trailers, drainage vehicles and mobile cranes, and it also has a heavy transport division.

 
 

1988

In 1988, Bert Wagenborg decides to leave the company, precisely 100 years after grandfather Egbert went to sea with his first tjalk.

A change of management takes place on 15 December 1988. Rob Wagenborg and Egbert Vuursteen are appointed directors of Wagenborg Beheer B.V.

 
 

1990

With a view to extending the shipping branch a sizeable newbuild programme is launched in 1990, consisting of four ships of around 3,000 DWT with the highest Finnish Ice Class and suitable for transporting high volume goods. The ships are given the names "Flinterborg", "Balticborg", "Eemsborg" and "Bothniaborg". "Rijnborg" is added in 1991, followed four months later by the sister ship "Scheldeborg". These six vessels can also transport containers, marking the introduction of the standard container size TEU, which stands for Twenty feet Equivalent Units.

 
 

1992 - 1995

In 1992 Lommerts KSM (cranes, special transport and assembly) is taken over. As a result of this, it is now possible to offer both horizontal and vertical transport over land and water. Another takeover of a specialist crane company follows a year later, that of Van der Leest Kraanbedrijf in Emmen.

In 1995, Lommerts KSM invests in a new crane with a lifting capacity of 400 tons and a flatbed trailer is also introduced. This giant is 23.5 x 3 metres with a loading capacity of 365 tons, driven on a total of 96 steerable wheels. Shortly afterwards the crane fleet is extended with the addition of four Spiering cranes.

 
 

1994

In 1994 Wagenborg introduces container-feeder vessels. The “Reestborg” and “Reggeborg”, with a capacity of 558 TEU, are built by Verolme in Heusden. These container ships stand out in that they do not have any hatches. Vertical rails form container guides from the holds to the gangways above. This leads to faster loading and unloading and it limits the chance of losing containers or any damage. The ships have a length of 140 metres and connections for 80 refrigerated containers. They have two independent diesel engines of 3250 kW, each delivering a service speed of 18 miles an hour.

 
 

1995 - 1996

Developments in the road transport sector also continue. The takeover of Reining has resulted in an expansion of the activities to the south and east, and that creates a need for new locations in those areas. To this end, Labie en Zn in Dongen is taken over on 1 March 1995.

In 1996 Reining Spedition GmbH in Bottrop, Germany, is added to the Reining Group.

Reining Warehousing B.V. is established in 1996. Warehousing means storing goods until they are needed in the production process.

 
 

1995

Changes in the shipping industry, such as the ever increasing vessel size and the introduction of bow thrusters, leads to a decline in towage activities in the ports of Delfzijl and Eemshaven. The focus therefore switches more to towage voyages. It is partly for this reason that the new "Watergeus" is added to the fleet on 1 April 1995. Her two engines, with a joint output of 1775 HP, represent a doubling of capacity and pulling power compared to her predecessor.

 
 

1995

On 15 September 1995 the "Kroonborg" is christened by Machteld Haaksman and Eva Muurman in the presence of His Majesty King Willem Alexander (who was at that time the Crown Prince) at Ferus Smit shipyard in Westerbroek. The first and second attempts to break the champagne bottle on the bow fail. But with the help of His Majesty the bottle hits the ship on the third attempt!

 
 

1996

Following the takeover of Boardexport B.V. in 1995 and Eems Dollard Scheepvaartkantoren in 1996, this new activity cluster is placed with Wagenborg Stevedoring B.V. under director Eric Wagenborg. In this way he follows in the footsteps of his grandfather Petrus and father Koop into the stevedoring arena.

 
 

1997

In 1997 the Wagenborg flag is raised in Kazakhstan. A consortium of seven oil companies is looking into oil extraction in the Caspian Sea, an area of around 300 x 300 km with only a three-metre water depth and where a metre of ice is sometimes formed in the winter. Wagenborg, which has expertise in shallow water navigation and ice, as well as knowledge of the logistics of oil and gas extraction, is asked to help to build a work island, develop a supply strategy and provide specifications for the necessary ships and materials.

 
 

1998

In the anniversary year 1998, Wagenborg is awarded the designation “Royal”.

 
 

2000

In 2000 Foxdrill Van Wezel, which focuses on the relocation of drilling rigs, is taken over by Wagenborg.

 
 

2001 - 2004

In 2001 Wagenborg Shipping Sweden is established.

In 2003 the company's Canadian branch is opened: Wagenborg Shipping North America Inc.

In 2004 the Greek establishment starts operations under the name Holland Hellenic Shipping Agencies.

 
 

2009

In august 2009, Queen Beatrix christens MS “Beatrix” in Delfzijl during Delfsail 2009.

 
 

2013

MS "Reestborg" is launched on 25 January 2013. This 23,000-ton multi-purpose ship, with a length of 170 metres and a breadth of 20.40 metres, is the biggest ship ever built by Ferus Smit shipyard in Leer. It is the first vessel in a series of three featuring the “eco-bow”. This, coupled with a low engine capacity, makes them more environmentally friendly.

On 11 July 2013 a contract is signed with the Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij B.V. for the building and operating of what is known as a "Walk to Work" vessel.

 

The Wagenborg Walk to Work vessel will play a crucial role in the maintenance and servicing of production platforms in the North Sea, ensuring safe, efficient, productive and cost-effective operations at offshore locations.

Share this page